Good evening and welcome to The British Deer Society

Code of Conduct

Photographing Deer - Code of Conduct

Code of Conduct

ENVIRONMENTAL: KNOWLEDGE OF SUBJECT AND PLACE

• Always put the welfare of your subject first
• Remember deer are wild animals
• Learn patterns of animal behaviour, so as not to disturb the subject. This will also help with your image composition
• Do not distress wildlife or their habitat
• Respect the routine needs of the subject
• Use appropriate lenses to photograph wild animals to prevent having to approach too close. We recommend a lens with a focal length of 300 mm
• Never surround deer
• If an animal shows any signs of stress or disturbance, move back and use a longer lens 
• Acquaint yourself with the fragility of the ecosystem
• Stay on paths that are intended to lessen impact. Keep a minimum of 50 meters between yourself and your subject
• Research your subject beforehand and avoid risking harm to capture an image


SOCIAL: KNOWLEDGE OF RULES AND LAWS

• When appropriate, inform managers or other authorities of your presence and purpose
• Help minimize cumulative impacts and maintain safety
• Acquaint yourself with any rules/laws/bylaws of the location
• If minimum distances exist for approaching wildlife, follow them
• In the absence of management authority, use good judgement
• Treat the wildlife, plants and places as if you were their guest
• Prepare yourself and your equipment for unexpected events


INDIVIDUAL: EXPERTISE AND RESPONSIBILITIES

• Respect and treat others courteously
• Avoid exposing yourself and others to risk of harm preventable mishaps
• Ask before joining others already shooting in an area
• Tactfully inform others if you observe them in engaging in inappropriate or harmful behaviour. Many people unknowingly endanger themselves and animals
• Report inappropriate behaviour to proper authorities
• Don’t argue with those who don’t care; report them
• Be a good role model, both as an observer and photographer
• Educate others by your actions; enhance their understanding